Walking the Road to the Win-Win: NASCIO Procurement Subcommittee’s Recommendations on Liability Limitations for State IT Contracting

These recommendations are intended to elucidate the various state and vendor interests that are involved in negotiating liability limitations and to help states and vendors negotiate better IT contract liability limitations that are “win-win” for both sides.

 

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Wireless in the Workplace: A Guide for Government Enterprises

The use of wireless technology in our personal lives has become almost commonplace with the proliferation of cell phones, personal digital assistants and wireless PC modems. Our demand for anytime, anywhere communications and access to information is quickly spreading to the workplace. Wireless local area networks (WLANs) and Wi-Fi “hot spots” are sprouting up everywhere, yet many individuals and organizations fail to fully understand the security risks of this inherently open technology and expose their systems unnecessarily. 

This publication is intended to help government enterprises make informed decisions about wireless technology and guide IT professionals through the opportunities and challenges of working in the wireless world. It highlights key issues such as:

  • wireless applications & uses
  • wireless technology options
  • wireless standards
  • wireless security
  • wireless network management & performance
  • wireless installation & maintenance

 

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HAVA (the Help America Vote Act 2002)—A Briefing Paper

This briefing paper provides an overview of the Help America Vote Act of 2002 (HAVA) and explores its IT-related challenges as well as NASCIO’s role in helping states to implement the Act. 

 

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Information Privacy: A Spotlight on Key Issues

NASCIO is pleased to announce the release of its newest publication, Information Privacy: A Spotlight on Key Issues. This publication, produced by the Privacy committee, serves as a resource for states developing privacy policies that protect citizen information and are compliant with federal and state legal requirements. This publication highlights key issues in the following areas of privacy: Children’s Information, Drivers’ Information, Health Information, Financial Information, Education Information, Social Security Numbers, Homeland Security-Related Information, Website Privacy Policies, and Government Data Matching Activities and Agreements.

In addition, the publication includes state examples for many of these areas of information privacy, an overview of recent privacy events at the federal level and a glossary of privacy related terms.

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Enterprise Architecture Maturity Model

An adaptive, dynamic enterprise architecture enables the enterprise to change and manage the complexities inherent in large government enterprise. Enterprise architecture brings an operating discipline to the organization and prescribes the necessary traceability from strategic intent to the capabilities that enable that intent. These capabilities include both business and technology components. Enterprise architecture doesn’t happen at once. It is an iterative, maturing discipline that provides management the operating discipline for organizing and engaging business and technology components to fulfill the mission of the organization. This maturity model provides a scale or metric for understanding where the organization is in its evolving discipline, and what steps are required to take it to the next level of maturity.

The NASCIO Enterprise Architecture Maturity Model provides a path for architecture and procedural improvements within an organization. As the architecture matures, predictability, process controls and effectiveness also increase. Development of the enterprise architecture is critical because it provides the rules and definition necessary for the integration of information and services at the design level across agency boundaries. Enterprise architecture includes business processes and representations, and supportive technology components. At its fullest maturity, enterprise architecture becomes an inter-enterprise concept and prescribes the infrastructure for inter-enterprise business processes and provides the design for allowing data to flow from agency to agency, just as water flows through the pipes and electricity flows through the wiring of a well planned home.

 

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Innovative Funding for Innovative State IT

During the past several years, many states have found it increasingly difficult to obtain funding for state IT projects through traditional means, such as via appropriations from the state general fund. In spite of these tight economic times, citizens’ demand for improved ways of doing business with state government and 24 x 7 access to government services has remained strong. The purpose of Innovative Funding for Innovative State IT: New Trends and Approaches for State IT Funding is to provide states with innovative avenues of funding so that they can provide citizens with the government services they demand. This publication details eleven innovative funding models and provides case studies on how each model has been implemented by a state. Innovative Funding for Innovative State IT also includes a study conducted by NASCIO’s Corporate Leadership Council (CLC) that surveyed the states on the types of funding models they are currently using. The survey results from the twenty-three states that responded are included in this publication.

Innovative Funding for Innovative State IT is divided into three main sections, the first of which describes eleven innovative funding models as well as baseline requirements for implementing each model and the benefits each model may bring. The second section includes the compiled results of the CLC’s survey regarding states’ current use of innovative funding models. This section also details trends in state IT funding identified from the CLC’s survey. The third section includes case studies from nine states that exemplify how each innovative funding model has been implemented. The states that provided case studies for this publication are: Massachusetts, Texas, Minnesota, Tennessee, Ohio, Missouri, Delaware, Arizona and Hawaii. The appendices include checklists to give states a starting point for implementing each funding model as well as a chart of the CLC’s survey results and a list of other innovative funding resources.

 

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Concept for Operations for Integrated Justice Information Sharing Version 1.0

ConOps provides a discipline-specific focus for justice information sharing, which in turn can be used to identify and expose broader IT architectural and infrastructure issues that must be addressed by CIOs. While this ConOps focuses primarily on information sharing in the justice arena, the concepts are applicable to any business domain.

ConOps defines the discipline-specific, business functions for integrated justice and explores the architectural implications for state CIOs, who are responsible for planning the IT enterprise architecture. Additionally, ConOps defines fundamental concepts, principles, functions and operational requirements for integrated justice information sharing, presents a scenario of integrated justice information sharing and a general methodology for states to use in validating their IT architecture for information sharing characteristics. Finally, this document articulates an action plan for the validation, implementation and expansion of this ConOps to other disciplines.

 

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Concept for Operations for Integrated Justice Information Sharing Validation Report

Concept for Operations for Integrated Justice Information Sharing Validation Report

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Federal Privacy Law Compendium, Version 1.0

To help states identify and assess federal laws that may have privacy implications for their information systems and policies, the NASCIO Privacy Committee has developed the Federal Privacy Law Compendium, Version 1.0. It is intended to serve as a resource for summaries of federal laws that may have an impact on the privacy of citizens’ information that is entrusted to state government. The Federal Privacy Law Compendium provides a starting point for states in their assessment of whether the summarized federal privacy laws will impact state information system operations and/or policies.

The Federal Privacy Law Compendium summarizes ten federal laws that deal with the privacy of information and highlights instances of potential impact on state government. The federal privacy laws summarized are:

  • The Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act of 1998
  • The Computer Fraud and Abuse Act of 1984
  • The Computer Matching & Privacy Protection Act of 1988 & Amendments of 1990
  • The Driver’s Privacy Protection Act of 1994
  • The Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986
  • The Fair Credit Reporting Act of 1970
  • The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974
  • The Gramm-Leach-Bliley Financial Services Modernization Act of 1999
  • The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996
  • The Privacy Act of 1974

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