Data: the Lifeblood of State Government

This report presents the case for investing in data management. It presents in simple terms WHY data and information must be properly managed. The report presents basic rationale for investing in the development of a formal data management program. This report is the first in a series of reports that will deal with WHY is data management important; HOW does state government get started; Legal aspects of data management.

 

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Is State IT Working on the Right Things?

What does it mean to be working on the right things? This determination is often difficult when considering the state as both an enterprise and a collective of individual agencies. Through interviews and formal surveys, NASCIO and Infosys Public Services gained insight from state IT leaders on the fundamental processes, mechanisms and criteria necessary to ensure that state IT is working on the right things. The resulting report will help state IT decision makers understand the key factors needed to identify the right things to do, see how they and their peer states stand against these factors and what can be done to bridge the gap.

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Building Successful Relationships: State CIO Advice for IT Partners

Given today’s fiscal environment, states are turning to their IT partners to provide cost-effective delivery of citizen services. This brief focuses on the best strategies for IT partners to engage with state CIOs while building successful business relationships.

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Funding: The Drive Wheel for Cross-Jurisdictional Collaboration

In many cases, funding a specific initiative can entail more than one funding source working together as a basket of funding streams to provide both initial seed funding and ongoing sustained funding. Seeking funding is necessary, coupled with the vision, goals and objectives of a collaborative. When evaluating grants, loans and direct payments, the intent of the funding stream must match the intent of the collaborative initiative. In considering the full portfolio of funding models, the funding options pursued must be appropriately matched to a long term sustainment strategy for the collaborative. Further, evaluating funding approaches essentially involves clear understanding of the total cost of ownership that includes transactional cost economics (TCE). Securing funding starts with an understanding the full costing.

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States and Open Data: From Museum to Marketplace – What’s Next

NASCIO takes a look at what has occurred across the states since NASCIO’s first report on open data published in 2009. This latest report examines progress in open data across state and local government. Open data initiatives are advancing at all levels of government in the United States and globally. States and local governments have partnered with industry to create innovative capabilities in delivering data to consumers. Those consumers include citizens, business, non-profit organization and government. The report also presents recommendations for continuing to advance state government open data initiatives and begin moving to a next level of maturity.

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Destination: Advancing Enterprise Portfolio Management – First Stop: Issues Management

State CIOs are managing a growing and diverse set of investments, services and collaborative arrangements. Enterprise portfolio management (EPM) is a discipline that provides the tools and best practices necessary for doing this proactively and successfully. EPM provides a view into the enterprise – not only projects, but also services, operations, programs and resources. EPM essentially turns enterprise architecture into action. EPM involves many portfolios. The first portfolio that drives the others is the portfolio of issues that identifies, scores and prioritizes the very issues we’re trying to solve through projects, programs, management initiatives and operations.

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Procurement: Avoiding Risky Business

The NASCIO Procurement Modernization Committee, in partnership with TechAmerica and the National Association of State Procurement Officials, continues to focus on state IT procurement reforms and highlight best practices at the state level. This brief is the third in a series of recommendations set forth by this collaborative. The purpose of the brief is to highlight some of the strategies used to first identify, then to avoid, transfer, mitigate, and ultimately accept the risks associated with the procurement of IT products or services. Although not all risks can be identified, the goal should be to understand how much risk is associated with a specific IT procurement and what tools, processes, benchmarks, and methodologies are available to uniquely address IT procurement risks.

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Effective Cross-Jurisdictional Collaboration – Governance is Critical!

Cross-jurisdictional collaboratives are on the rise. As the number of such collaboratives increases, there are essential ingredients for framing and sustaining successful and even exceptional collaborative arrangements that deliver real outcomes. As NASCIO reviewed successful collaboratives, proper governance continually surfaced as one of those essential ingredients for effective sharing of government information and services and effective employment of technology across two or more enterprises. This issue brief presents examples of effective governance and describes what constitutes effective governance.

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The Changing Roles of the Chief Architect and the CIO (webinar)

Three important findings have combined to motivate this topic:

  • #1 Poor data management performance to date (requires additional or difference effort)
  • #2 Recognition that data is not a project (requires a difference approach)
  • #3 Lack of domain expertise (requires different career preparation)

Combined these three findings require a new look at these roles.  This webinar will explore the role of a Chief Data Officer (CDO) as a function needed by organizations (especially state governments).  While we don’t yet have all the answers, we can at least lay out three necessary but insufficient prerequisites to making progress faster than we have achieved to date.

Host:
Eric Sweden,
Program Director, Enterprise Architecture & Governance
NASCIO

Presenter:
Dr. Peter Aiken
Associate Professor
Department of Information Systems/VCU
President:  DAMA-International  http://dama.org

Peter Aiken, Ph. D. is widely acclaimed as one of the top ten data management authorities in the world.  In addition to examining the data management practices of more than 500 organizations, he has spent multi-year immersions with organizations as diverse as the U.S. Department of Defense, Deutsche Bank, Nokia, Wells Fargo, the Commonwealth of Virginia, and numerous other high profile clients.  As President of DAMA International, his expertise in the practice is unquestioned.  He has been an Associate Professor at Virginia Commonwealth University’s School of Business Information Systems Department since 1993 and owns Data Blueprint, an award-winning data management and IT consulting firm.
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Driving Efficiency and Innovation by Consistently Managing Complexity and Change (webinar)

This presentation outlines the four pillars of a Holistic Enterprise Architecture: architectural models, framework, methodology, and implementation/solution models. It also explains the business and technology gains, and demystifies the practice of implementing a successful Holistic Enterprise Architecture.

Agenda:

  • The Four Pillars of Holistic Enterprise Architecture
  • Business and Technology Gains Achieved through Enterprise Architecture
  • How to Implement Successful Holistic Enterprise Architecture

Host:
Eric Sweden,
Program Director, Enterprise Architecture & Governance
NASCIO

Presenter:
Samuel B Holcman
Pinnacle Business Group, Inc.
Enterprise Architecture Center Of Excellence (EACOE)
Business Architecture Center Of Excellence (BACOE)

Summary:
This presentation outlines the four pillars of a Holistic Enterprise Architecture: architectural models, framework, methodology, and implementation/solution models. It also explains the business and technology gains, and demystifies the practice of implementing a successful Holistic Enterprise Architecture.

It is only within the past 20 years that we have begun to develop an art and science for identifying and defining the graphical and textual descriptions of whole enterprises. Until this time, any art or science that we had related to this endeavor pertained to parts of enterprises – for example, organizational design and/or systems development. Because the focus of this presentation is on Enterprise Architecture, have there been successful enterprises that were never architected?

Yes. However, they were successful in relation to other non-architected enterprises. Moreover, the pace of change was slower in the industrial age, compared with the information age of today. Contemporary enterprises have to be able to adjust much more rapidly to meet changing demands in the face of global competition. This makes it critical to have readily available descriptive representations of one’s enterprise to use as a basis for making change.

The age-old question now arises in enterprises:

  • How can one change something that one cannot “see”?
  • How does one “see” an enterprise?

This is Holistic Enterprise Architecture.

DISCLAIMER
NASCIO makes no endorsement, express or implied, of any products, services, or websites contained herein, nor is NASCIO responsible for the content or the activities of any linked websites. Any questions should be directed to the administrators of the specific sites to which this publication provides links. All critical information should be independently verified.

This project was supported by Grant No. 2010-DJ-BX-K046 awarded by the Bureau of Justice Assistance. The Bureau of Justice Assistance is a component of the Department of Justice’s Office of Justice Programs, which also includes the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, the Office for Victims of Crime, and the SMART Office. Points of view or opinions in this document are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

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